The Rise and Fall of Salvage Yards

     I have been doing this blog for one year next month, and we have talked a lot about salvage yards. We talked about benefits, conditions, and aspects of the business, while explaining some common misconceptions dealing with recycling and the environment. My goal has always been to open people’s eyes about salvage yards; but with this month’s blog post, we are going to take a different approach. I am going to talk about the cold-hearted truth that “Salvage Yards” are vanishing all around the country and the world, but there is still hope for some.

     Why do you think salvage yards are closing down? Think about it a minute or two!  Well here are some answers. The economy goes down and up so many times that people do not have extra money to fix their project cars. Reason two is that there is the internet.  Everyone looks up what the part is online. They know the prices and details about the part. People want the cheapest price, and that is all that matters to them. They no longer care about the quality of the merchandise. Then you have all the aftermarket parts from China and different countries, which are cheaper.  You will have a customer for twenty years that no longer comes because they can get the parts they need from the internet. If you have ten of your customers doing that, then you will be losing a substantial profit.

     The third reason has to do with small business. Mom and Pop stores that service small towns are being bought up by big businesses that have stores in every city in the country. It is hard to compete with huge corporations with thousands of employees. They have the budget and the manpower that small businesses do not have.

     The fourth is that the price of scrap metal drops dramatically with no warning. You will have this huge amount of metal to scrap, and at the same time money continually going out. Then with no warning the price goes from $100 a ton to $20 a ton.

     The fifth and final reason is with the environment. People think that salvage yards hurt the land and the air, but some people make these accusations without getting all the facts. Yes, there are some places in the US that do not properly deal with oil, gasoline, and other liquids; which does leave a negative impact on the environment. But look at the salvage yard and get all your facts before making accusations about someone’s business.

     These are all serious reasons why salvage yards across the United States have either been forced to close down or close down because they are not making any money. It is so sad because salvage yards are a part of an era to many people, but I believe salvage yards are not over!

     A very important fact in staying open is being up to date with every possible regulation there is, especially the environmental ones. Recycling everything you can while staying on your toes. You can never be content with what the business is doing; you need to always push for more production and more customers. Always be on the lookout for new things to add to the business. We started off in 1954 by just selling auto parts, but look at us now. We continue to sell new and used parts; we have an auto repair.  We scrap junk cars and scrap metal, and we do town towing. That is just a list of the many things we do, but there is always more.

     Salvage yards still exist and are flourishing, but it will always be a struggle to get our name out there in a positive light. We will never give up the hope for salvage yards in the United Sates or the world. We will continue to push for the future of salvage yards everywhere.

 

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The Salvage Yard

     This month’s blog post is about R. H. Willson. The past blog posts focused on different ways that the salvage yard recycles.  There are always more ways and more items to recycle, but I just wanted to have this month’s post focus on the business.

     My grandfather opened this business in 1954. He started off by selling auto parts. Overtime the business grew to have up to three different buildings. Down the road my parents bought the business in 1996 and expanded even further. In 1998 they started an auto repair on the premises. Bringing in different customers and staying competitive in the industry. One big change was computerizing everything. Changing all the paperwork from pen and paper to computer generated slips. That was a big change for the industry and everyone working here. Overtime people learned to love computers because it made work faster and more organized. With the help of the computers, the parts industry expanded. Now people can buy their parts online, over the phone, or walking in. The expansion was a necessary progression, but there were other avenues the salvage yard also explored.

     The auto repair was another great expansion to the business.  Fixing cars and buying parts go hand in hand allowing for our customers to have faster service. Eventually we expanded by getting more mechanics, which allowed us to help more customers.

     Another aspect of R. H. Willson is town towing and picking up junk cars. The town towing allows us to be involved in the town and get exposure by doing it. It is very convenient because if a car needs to get fixed, there is an auto repair on the premises to fix the car. As I said in the beginning of the paragraph, we also pick up junk cars, which lead us to our last point.

     Not too long ago, the business got a scale for scrap metal. You come to the salvage yard and drive over the scale, which weighs how much the metal is. It opened up another avenue of the business completely. People bring their scrap metal here, and we pick up junked cars for scrap metal. Getting rid of the excess metal in people’s houses or business helps the environment and our salvage yard.

     R. H. Willson is constantly improving and making adjustments so we can better help our customers. We have been opened since 1954; I hope there will be many more wonderful years of being innovative for this salvage yard and all salvage yards out there.

Recycling of Antifreeze

     Antifreeze is an important fluid in the radiator of your car. The exact definition of antifreeze is; “a liquid used in the radiator of an internal-combustion engine to lower the freezing point of the cooling medium,” (dictionary.com). AdditionallyAntifreeze (engine coolant) performs several functions in addition to providing freeze protection. Antifreeze contains chemicals that inhibit corrosion and scale formation in the engine and radiator. Antifreeze (engine coolant) provides protection against boiling in the summer. At one atmosphere pressure pure water boils at 212 °F (100 °C) but a 50/50 blend of water/ethylene glycol boils at 223 °F (106 °C),” (www.eetcorp.com).

     So, we now understand that antifreeze is very important to your car, but what exactly is in antifreeze? Is it good or bad for the environment?

     “Almost all forms of coolants and heat transfer fluids rely on glycol antifreeze to lower the freezing point of the solution. Common nomenclature calls the resulting solution antifreeze as well. Technically, though, it is more appropriate to call these solutions engine coolants or heat transfer fluids. There are two varieties of glycol: ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. Both can be used in automotive or heavy-duty engine coolants or glycol-based heat transfer fluids. Modern engines use a mixture of glycol and water for coolant, with corrosion inhibitor chemicals and dyes included with the glycol,” (www.eetcorp.com). Yes, antifreeze is dangerous to the environment both land and aquatic. Plus, if the antifreeze is digested it acts as a poison and could harm someone.

     Knowing all that is stated above, you may ask why we still use antifreeze. To answer that question, we use it because the cooling system is extremely important in maintaining the temperature and preventing damage to your engine. Recycling antifreeze, by making sure it is handled and disposed of properly lowers the risks of it becoming a hazard to the environment.

     This blog post is to shed some light on yet another motor vehicle liquid that R. H. Willson recycles and handles with the upmost care. We drain the antifreeze from the cars and temporarily store it in special containers, where it is picked up by an authorized antifreeze recycling agent. We have been handling antifreeze in this manner for over 20 years, which is before the recycling trend started. That can only mean that R. H. Willson always goes above and beyond to protect the environment and the land that we are on.

Find out more about Antifreeze Recycling!!!!! http://www.mass.gov/eea/grants-and-tech-assistance/guidance-technical-assistance/agencies-and-divisions/ota/education-and-outreach/masscar/antifreeze-recycling.pdf

Works Cited

 http://www.eetcorp.com/antifreeze/antifreeze-faq.htm#q14

http://www.dictionary.com/

 

COOL CARS …… for HOT DAYS

Do you want to drive a COOL CAR this summer?

  Cool Car instrument panel thedetroitbureau_com

The simple task of performing preventative maintenance on your vehicle’s air conditioning system can increase your chances.

In this article found at www.VehicleMD.com we are reminded that proper care and maintenance can increase the life and reliability of your automobile’s A/C system when you most need it, during the hot summer months.

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AC button two lights

ARTICLE BY LAUREN HENDERSON – JULY EDITION OF VEHICLE MD

Longer days, outdoor concerts and the sound of neighborhood moms and dads calling their kids in for dinner; all signs that summer has indeed arrived. Most of us long for summertime all winter. When it finally gets here, it wastes no time reminding us sweltering heat and sunburns are also part of the deal. Even still, we put on ball caps, slap on sunscreen and stick to our convictions—summer is the best season of all.

Jumping in a lake or pool is the greatest—and arguably most fun—way to cool off when it’s hot outside. Unfortunately, life doesn’t stop when school lets out. You’ll need to rely on your vehicle’s air conditioning for a reprieve from the heat as you drop the kids off at various camps or drive to and from work. Nothing is worse than the car’s A/C being on and the vents blowing hot air. There are several things you can do—and ask about—the next time you take your vehicle in for service to make sure you stay cool all summer long.

Turn it on
Even when you don’t need A/C—like during the ridiculously cold winter we had last year—your vehicle still needs you to turn the cool air on for a few minutes per week.

The A/C system removes hot air in addition to pumping cold air into the vehicle. To do that, it must rely on several different mechanical components. Consistently running the A/C will ensure the hoses, valves and pumps—all essential parts of the A/C system—stay well lubricated and ready for use when temperatures outside begin to warm up.

Check the refrigerant
Refrigerant checks are not always included in your owner’s manual’s maintenance schedule. Make sure you ask your technician to check the refrigerant levels in your car. If you notice the air coming out of your vents isn’t cold—or isn’t as cold as you think it should be—recharging the A/C system with the appropriate manufacturer-recommended refrigerant and to the recommended capacity could solve the problem.

Get it serviced
Consider asking your technician about a full A/C service. It’s a good idea to have this completed once a year—ideally before the hotter months hit—so you don’t find yourself without A/C when you need it most.

Most standard A/C service checks include a visual inspection, temperature analysis, pressure readings, refrigerant top-off and a leak test to make sure all your system lines and hoses are leak free.

An A/C service can help you find the issue if you’re already noticing problems with your system or alert you of a problem so you can fix it before it becomes worse.

Cabin check
Special sanitizing treatments can help remove foul smells coming from your vehicle’s vents, so can a clean cabin air filter.

The cabin air filter can become clogged with annoying allergens in addition to dirt, dust and debris. Circulating pollen and harmful spores through your vehicle’s cabin air filter can be a problem for passengers with asthma or allergies.

A cabin air filter filled with dirt and dust can decrease the airflow coming from your vents, and, in extreme cases, it can even cause the A/C system to fail.

Check your owner’s manual to see when yours should be replaced. Usually it’s once a year. Ask your technician to check your cabin air filter to see if it needs replacement. You may be surprised at what you find trapped in there!

What’s new and cool
It’s always a good idea to stay familiar with new and important standards. After all, vehicles are historically one of people’s biggest expenses. If you’ve purchased a new vehicle in the past two years, your car may have a different kind of refrigerant inside its A/C compressor than the R-134a of years past.

According to Automotive News, automakers have begun using a new type of refrigerant called R-1234yf in later model vehicles like Cadillac XTS, Chevrolet Spark EV, Chrysler 300, Dodge Challenger, Honda Fit EV, Jeep Cherokee and Range Rover.

“Previously, vehicles used HFC-134a. HFC-134a is a high global warming potential material that is currently being phased out because it contributes to global warming,” said Luc Morvillier global business manager for Honeywell refrigerants.

Instead, manufacturers are adopting R-1234yf to comply with environmental regulations and the demand for higher efficiency. According to Honeywell, all new cars sold in Europe after January 1, 2017 must have an air conditioning refrigerant with a global warming potential below 150 starting in 2017.

The new R-1234yf refrigerant doesn’t only mean better things for the environment, it means good things for you, too. Even though R-1234yf promises lower greenhouse gas emissions and to linger less in the atmosphere, it still cools as effectively. This means you won’t have to sacrifice your comfort for the environment now or in the future.

“Car owners can rest assured, you won’t see a performance difference if your air conditioning system uses R-1234yf,” Morvillier said.

After extensive research and testing, Honeywell indicated that R-1234yf is safe for you and your vehicle’s passengers, too.

Ask your technician what kind of refrigerant your vehicle’s manufacturer recommends. Not only is it good to be a savvy consumer, it’s important to know what your car needs so you’re not wondering in the future.

Preventative maintenance is a must for every vehicle system. Whether it’s a tire rotation, oil change, fuel system cleaning or your vehicle’s A/C system, taking proper care of your car will increase the chance of your car taking care of you for a longer amount of time.

Summer brings with it lots of fun. Don’t let a bum A/C system get in the way. Find an open road and crank up the tunes—and the A/C.

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Info found at http://www.vehiclemd.com

Photo found at http://www.thedetroitbureau.com

Photo found at http://www.girardatlarge.com

After Life of Shredded Car

color car shredder

This interesting article was found at www.rpowersource.com

“The Value of Auto Shredder Residue” explains that the life of an automobile does not have to end at the crusher.

The Value in Auto Shredder Residue

In North America every year, almost 12 million

automobiles reach the end of their useful lives. As

new cars continue to be manufactured and sold, the

disposal of old vehicles represents a growing issue and

environmental threat. Fortunately, 75 percent of an

end-of-life vehicle (ELV) can be recycled.

Automobiles consist of primarily ferrous metals, such

as steel and iron as well as non-ferrous metals like

aluminum and zinc. Automobile recyclers have long

been able to recover up to 85 percent of a vehicle’s total

materials just by collecting the residual ferrous and non-ferrous metals

that are left behind after shredding. The remaining materials—a mixture

of plastics, wood, fabric and glass—are known as automotive shredder

residue (ASR) or auto fluff.

ASR usually consists of a Mixture of plastics, rubber; glass, wood

products, cloth, paper, foam, dirt and electric wiring, as well as, a variety

of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. The U.S. generates around five million

tons of ASR every year. While most ASR is currently disposed of in landfills,

up to 60 percent of auto shredder residue can actually be recovered as

reusable materials.

An ASR separation system can be a continuous dry process that

separates ASR into a mixture of polymers, wood, glass, metals, sand, rocks

and dirt. Once the oversized material is removed, the residue may go

through a shredder to further reduce its size. The ASR is then separated

with the use of a trommel screen before a magnetic separator recovers

the ferrous metals and an eddy current separator and other separators

recover the non-ferrous metals. The end product contains more than 90

percent of the recycled polymers that were present in the original ASR.

In 2013, the EPA announced a new interpretation of their regulations

on ASR that allows plastics to be recovered during the recycling process,

provided that the materials do not contain levels of PCBs exceeding 50

parts per million. This new interpretation has the potential to reduce the

amount of ASR that is consigned to landfills every year by more than one

million tons and may improve the material recovery rate for ELVs to more

than 90 percent.

Worldwide Recycling Equipment Sales, LLC in Moberly, Missouri,

can supply a full range of equipment to dry, sort and move automotive

shredder residue. Our new and used dryers are designed specifically to

dry ASR, making the material easy to transport, separate and handle. We

can size and build a dryer to best suit your specific project needs. In the

past, we have designed plants for industry clients that process 40 and 80

tons per hour.

Our Vulcan® Dryer Systems consist of a correctly sized drum and a

burner mounted to a combustion chamber. After passing through the

dryer, the dried material is discharged to a transfer conveyor for further

sorting and separation. The vapor from the process is pulled through a

cyclone that is specifically designed to deal with the fine ASR dust, as

well as a high-temperature baghouse which removes all fine particulates

from the vapor stream. All ductwork, cyclone and other high-wear areas

in the system have abrasive resistant plates to reduce lifetime wear and

maintenance costs.

Recycling the polymers and residual metals in ASR would save the

equivalent of 24 million barrels of oil each year and would reduce carbon

dioxide emissions by 12 million tons. As recyclers around the world strive

to recycle as much of old vehicles as possible, the value of auto shredder

residue is only increasing and growing more apparent.

For more information on ASR drying systems, contact Worldwide

Recycling Equipment Sales, LLC at (660) 263-7575 or wwrequip@

wwrequip.com. View our complete inventory online at www.wwrequip.com.

 Savannah Cooper

Writer/Copy/Social Media Specialist, Worldwide Recycling Equipment Sales, LLC

Photo created from combination Pintrest post and R.H. Willson

Shine some light on your broken tail-light

We’ve all had those days when the last thing we need is something breaking, especially an essential part of your car! You need not worry, we’ve found some great tips and tricks to help you decide how to fix that pesky broken tail-light. If you plan on doing it yourself, we’ve got you covered.

 

DIY

Estimated Time: 15-20 minutes

  • First you are going to need a list of appropriate tools: sockets, wrenches, a screwdriver, a ratchet wrench, and potentially other elements, depending on your vehicle’s condition, make, model, etc. Also gloves can come in handy.
  • Go into the cargo/trunk space and remove the cover over the tail-light and turn signal. Once that cover is removed you can then safely and carefully remove the bulb. Be cautious of broken glass and be careful that the bulb is not too hot to touch.
  •  You can remove the cover by either twisting it off or using a wrench or screwdriver.
  • After replacing the new tail-light test it to see if it works.
  • Refer to your car’s handbook for any needed instructions

You can find used tail-lights at R.H. Willson-Used Auto Parts, where our employees will be more than willing to lend a helping hand.