Recycled Oil

     Last month’s blog post was well nothing. I didn’t post anything last month so everyone could take time to read the previous posts and digest them. Take some time to understand what this blog is really about, which is to open people’s eyes and minds about salvage yards. There is always more to things then people imagine.

     Saying that let’s dive right into this month’s blog post, which is OIL! Most people know exactly what oil is or have a common knowledge to describe the liquid. Oil is “a viscous liquid derived from petroleum, especially for use as a fuel or lubricant,” (Google.com, 1). That is a basic definition of the liquid because we know that oil can be used in cooking and painting as well. Oil has many vast uses, but for the purpose of this post we are going to stick to things that pertain to cars or heat. Now that we have some facts on the topic on hand, let’s discuss how oil is used differently at R. H. Willson.

     The obvious is that at a salvage yard cars are a very important part of the business. So, yes we use the oil where it is necessary in cars or vehicles, but when they are junked we take the appropriate precautions to drain the liquid. I am not going to go over the rest of the uses of oil pertaining to cars because I want to talk about a very important use of oil. More importantly how the yard does something different to obtain it. What is this very important thing, it is HEAT.

     A large amount of the population use oil to heat their homes or businesses, but R. H. Willson is a little different. We not only use oil to heat our business, but the oil that we use is recycled from the vehicles that we get.

     R. H. Willson has been aware of the environment and the effects of oil for a very long time. Saying that let’s get into our process of recycling the oil.

     It all starts with the cars that we pick up or are brought to the business. Once they are on the premise and determined junked, we take care of the liquids. The cars are then brought into our garage where we take great care into draining them. The oil from the car flows into drain buckets, and then is stored in 55 gallon drums that are leak proof and spill proof. I know it means the same thing, but it is very important component to why we use the drums we have and for storing oil. The oil drums are stored in a specific area designed for the storage of oil, and we follow all the used oil storage regulations.

     Now you ask how is the oil recycled to heat the building. Well the oil is transferred from the 55 gallon drum very carefully and efficiently into a Waste Oil Heater or Furnace. These furnaces are specifically for the reuse of used oil. We have had our furnace for over 30 years, and we have loved it every step of the way.

     You may think “ok” the furnace probably heats a tiny part of the building, but then you would be wrong! It heats not one but two steal buildings. We only use our Waste Oil Heater. It heats both the auto repair’s and the auto part’s buildings. Two very large buildings get their entire heat source from recycled oil. It is a cost effective way to recycle the oil back into our day to day process.

     R. H. Willson has always takes time to recycle and give back to their planet. One example is mention above with the Waste Oil Heater. I never even thought about how the business that I work at is getting their heat, but someone 30 years ago did and that is what matters. On a day-to-day basis, we all live in this world, which means that we all want what is best for the environment not only for ourselves but for the generations to come. Take a good look and realize that junk yards were the true recyclers before everyone knew what recycling was.

Works Cited

https://www.google.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s